Essential Amino Acids

 

Essential amino acids refer to the amino acids that the human body (or other vertebrates) cannot synthesize or the synthesis speed is far from being able to meet the needs of the body and must be supplied by food proteins. Essential amino acids must be obtained directly from food, otherwise it will not maintain the body ’s nitrogen balance and affect health. There are 8 essential amino acids for adults. The synthesis of histidine in infants and young children can not meet the needs, so there are 9 essential amino acids required for infants (under 4 years old).

Säräng Peptide with the proven amino acids analysis result, power-packed with all 9 type of essential amino acids, in order of largest quantity are: leucine, valine, threonine, penylalanine, isoleucine, lysine, histidine, trytophan, methionine.

  • Leucine

    Leucine promote the healing of bones, skin, and muscle tissue, and are recommended for those recovering from surgery. Leucine also lowers elevated blood sugar levels and aids in increasing growth hormone production.

    Deficiency Problem
    Hyperinsulinemia; depression ; Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (Note: Deficiencies in BCAA in CFS, GWS, FM are associated with muscle weakness, fatigue, and post-exertional exhaustion); acute hunger; Kwashiorkor (starvation); Vitamin B-12 deficiency in pernicious anemia.

    Food Sources
    Natural sources of leucine include brown rice, beans, meat, nuts, soya beans, and whole wheat.

  • Valine

    Valine is actively absorbed and used directly by muscle as an energy source, not processed by the liver before entering the bloodstream. Any acute physical stress (including surgery, sepsis, fever, trauma, starvation) requires higher amounts of valine, leucine and isoleucine than any of the other amino acids. 

    Deficiency Problem
    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is caused by the inability to metabolize leucine, isoleucine, and valine. The disease is so named because urine from affected people smells like maple syrup. A deficiency may affect the myelin covering of the nerves.

    Food Sources
    Rich food sources of valine include dairy products, grains, meat, mushrooms, peanuts, and soy protein. Supplemental L-valine should always be taken in balance with the other branched-chain amino acids, L-isoleucine and L-leucine.

  • Threonine

    Threonine helps to prevent fatty buildup in the liver. It enhances the immune system - aiding in the production of antibodies, and may be helpful in treating some types of depression.

    Deficiency Problem

    Because the threonine content of grains is low, vegetarins are more likely than others to have deficiencies. It is a precursor of isoleucine and imbalance may result if the synthesis rate from aspartate is incorrect. In humans, deficiency may result in irritability and a generally difficult personality.

  • Phenylalanine

    Because of phenylalanine relationship to the action of the central nervous system, this amino acid can elevate mood, decrease pain, aid in memory and learning, and suppress the appetite.

    Deficiency Problem
    Deficiency symptoms of phenylalanine are: bloodshot eyes; cataract; and schizophrenic behavior.

     

    Food Sources

    Good food sources of phenylalanine are curd, milk, pulses and legumes, poultry, groundnuts, pistachio nuts, almonds and leafy vegetables.

  • Isoleucine

    Isoleucine is needed for hemoglobin formation and also stabilizes and regulates blood sugar and energy levels. These amino acids are valuable for athletes because they enhance energy, increase endurance, and aid in the healing and repair of muscle tissue.

    Deficiency Problem

    Isoleucine has been found to be deficient in people suffering from many different mental and physical disorders.  A deficiency of isoleucine can lead to symptoms similar to those of hypoglycemia.

     

    Food Sources

    Food sources of isoleucine include almonds, cashews, chicken, chickpeas, eggs, fish, lentils, liver, meat, rye, most seeds, and soy protein.

  • Lysine

    Lysine is needed for proper growth and bone development in children; it helps calcium absorption and maintains a proper nitrogen balance in adults. It aids in the production of antibodies, hormones, and enzymes, and helps in collagen formation and tissue repair. Because it helps to build muscle protein, it is good for those recovering from surgery and sports injuries. It also lowers high serum triglyceride levels.

    Deficiency Problem

    Deficiencies can result in anemia, bloodshot eyes, enzyme disorders, hair loss, an inability to concentrate, irritability, lack of energy, poor appetite, reproductive disorders, retarded growth, and weight loss.

     

    Food Sources

    Rich food sources of lysine include cheese, eggs, fish, lima beans, milk, potatoes, red meat, soya products, and yeast.

  • Histidine

    Histidine is significant in the growth and repair of tissues. It performs important anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and anti-secretory functions within the body. Histamine, an important immune system chemical, is derived from histidine. Histamine aids in sexual arousal.

    Deficiency Problem

    Can cause pain in the bony joints.

     

    Food Sources

    Natural sources of histidine include rice, green vegetables, milk, bananas, wheat, and rye.

  • Trytophan

    Tryptophan is necessary for the production of vitamin B3 (niacin). It is used by the brain to produce serotonin, a necessary neurotransmitter that transfers nerve impulses from one cell to another and is responsible for normal sleep and which exerts a calming effect.

    Deficiency Problem

    Deficiency symptoms of Tryptophan are dermatitis, diarrhea, dementia, insomnia and digestion problems.

     

    Food Sources

    Rich food sources of Tryptophan includes brown rice, cottage cheese, meat, peanuts, and soy protein.

  • Methionine

    Methionine is required for the absorption, transportation, and bioavailability of zinc and selenium in the body. Methionine also facilitates the breakdown of fats and prevents accumulation of fat in the liver and arteries.

    Deficiency Problem

    Methionine deficiency can cause apathy, loss of pigmentation in hair, edema, lethargy, liver damage, muscle loss, fat loss, skin lesions, weakness, and slowed growth in children.

    Food Sources

    High levels of methionine can be found in eggs, meat, and fish; sesame seeds, Brazil nuts, and some other plant seeds; and cereal grains. Most fruits and vegetables contain very little.

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